The War Resisters League affirms that all war is a crime against humanity.  We are determined not to support any kind of war, international or civil, and to strive nonviolently for the removal of all causes of war, including racism, sexism and all forms of exploitation.

WRL's 95th Anniversary Celebration

War Resisters League celebrated its 95 Anniversary on October 11th, 2018, a packed house - raising over $10,000 in the night over the course of grassroots community supporters and lifting up the work of phenomenal activists and organizers across our movement communities.

Thanks to all who came and sorry for those who couldn't make it! Stay tuned for video and audio clips from the night and more ways you can support WRL into its 95th Year.

Toward peace!

A Message from Movement Elder, Mandy Carter

I graduated high school in the summer of 1966 in Central New York during the tail ends of the Civil Rights Movement and during the height of the U.S.-led wars in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos. That summer, almost 400,000 men were drafted. Having lived and been raised in two orphanages and a foster home, I left New York and hitchhiked my way to California to attend the Institute for the Study of Nonviolence. I was barely out of my teens when I was first arrested at the Oakland Induction Center in 1967, the same year Dr. Martin Luther King gave his Beyond Vietnam speech. While in jail I was invited by a War Resisters League West staffer to a potluck - my very first introduction to WRL.

Building Anti-colonial Power - 1 Year After Hurricane Maria

A year ago today, the deadliest U.S.-based natural disaster - Hurricane Maria - devastated the island of Puerto Rico, home to over 3 million people. The hurricane shattered an already unstable infrastructure, crumbling from almost two centuries of parasitic U.S. colonialism. 3,000 people died because of an explicit strategy to keep aid from reaching the island. Boricua activism and calls from all corners of the world for decolonization and self-determination have only increased since Maria. The solutions aren’t coming from the U.S., but where they’ve always come from: Boricuas.